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I've heard it said that open-air preaching is futile and useless. The actual phrase that was used by the brethren was that street preaching was just "pissing up a rope" (you can find a nice, lovely, thoughtful definition of that Christian phrase in the Urban Dictionary or in the Wiktionary).

Noah, "a preacher of righteousness" (2Pet 2.5), was given 120 years to preach to lost people, warn them of coming judgment and wrath, and call them to the gracious salvation provided by God.

But he won no convert.

Gee... What a tool (also defined in the Urban Dictionary). I guess he was just pissing up a rope.

For apostasy there is no remedy but judgment.

2Timothy 4.3-4For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.

With regard to open-air preaching, street ministry, and intentional evangelism... Since that is the clear, biblical model of the main thrust of the Great Commission...

I think that's a fine rope to piss up.


Categoría: Evangelism

The Glory is Departed: 1Samuel 4.19-20

Downloads: notes | audio
Marginalia: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

Ichabod was the name given to the child of Phinehas, one of the priests, one of Eli's sons. His name means "the glory is departed." 

Ichabod shows us a picture of God's people left alone to their own devices... empty, defeated, no power, no victory. Ichabod is a picture of...

INSTITUTIONALIZED CHURCH-IANTY

He has a twin brother in the New Testament: The Church at Ephesus. God warned the Ephesians to get right with Him or else He would remove their candlestick (the glory is departed!). 

We need to return to God and that means we need to return to Scripture, and to Scripture alone.

Or... we can stay put in our apathetic indifference... wallowing in the carnal, worldly activities of a powerless, defeated, stagnant, institutionalized “Church-ianty” that God has named...

“ICHABOD”

Categoría: Preaching & Teaching

Four times in the English New Testament the word "dispensation" appears (1Cor 9.17; Eph 1.10; Eph 3.2; Col 1.25) and it is always a translation of the Greek word oikonomia, a word very similar to our English word “economy.” 

That shouldn't surprise us since the English word "economy" is derived from the Greek oikonomia. In Greek oikos means house and nemein means manage. Together oikos + nemein (house + manage) form oikonomia and it refers to household management (the managing of the resources and/or affairs of a household) as a servant or steward would manage the household affairs of his master (link).

The English word "economy" means the same thing (as it comes from the Greek through Latin and French): it means "management of resources." A common definition of "economy" is given by Webster: 

  • The management of resources.
  • The management of household affairs.​

The person charged with managing the resources and/or household affairs of another is called, in English, a steward. And (wouldn't you know!) that English word "steward" in the King James Bible is a translation of oikonomos., thus showing us that each dispensation is an economy based on the stewardship that God gives a steward, expecting that steward to manage the resources and affairs committed to him by the Lord according to the will and desires of the Lord. 

1Corinthians 4.1-2Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards [oikonomos] of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards [oikonomos], that a man be found faithful.

Dispensations are not the invention of John Darby. They are the economies (stewardships) that God establishes with men throughout history.

Categoría: Dispensations

Think About Death Every Day by Ryan Holiday

Original Article: HTTP or PDF

In late 1569, a French nobleman named Michel de Montaigne was given up as dead after being flung from a galloping horse.

As his friends carried his limp and bloodied body home, Montaigne watched his own life slip away, like some dancing spirit on the “tip of his lips,” only to have it return at the last possible second.

This sublime and unusual experience marked the moment Montaigne changed his life. Within a few years, he would be one of the most famous writers in Europe. After his accident, Montaigne went on to write volumes of popular essays, serve two terms as mayor, travel internationally as a dignitary, and serve as a confidante of the king.

Leer más: Think About Death Every Day

Categoría: Life Lessons

New Web Site

I put together a "landing page" web site for street work. It's just a simple site with a name that's easy to remember so we can give it on tracts, etc. while out street preaching.

Theology101.net

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